Founded by Dr. Clive Cussler, the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA) is a non-profit, volunteer foundation dedicated to preserving our maritime heritage through the discovery, archaeological survey and conservation of shipwreck artifacts.

Clive Cussler, Founder of NUMA

Pigeon Forge Hosts World’s Largest Titanic Museum

The glamorous grand staircase delights visitors.

The glamorous grand staircase delights visitors.

Nestled not far from the foot of the Smokey Mountains, a replica of an enormous ship faces The Parkway looking for all the world like it’s ready to set sail into the steady traffic cruising through Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

As they board, passengers see lifeboats lashed in tightly above first class cabins near the bow. Above them, one of four majestic stacks stands tall as if ready to belch smoke before embarking on a voyage that will launch the travelers back in time…to April 15, 1912. That’s when the 883-foot White Star liner—sailing from Southampton, UK, to New York—suffered one of the most tragic voyages in maritime history. more »

Treasure Ships of the Great Lakes

Diver explores the remains of an unidentified coal carrier in Georgian Bay, Tobermory, Lake Huron. Photo Credit: Bill Hughes.

Diver explores the remains of an unidentified coal carrier in Georgian Bay, Tobermory, Lake Huron. Photo Credit: Bill Hughes.

Jim Barrett of St. Paul, Minnesota, writes: “After researching the CITY OF BANGOR, sunk in Lake Superior in 1926—and how its cargo of new automobiles was salvaged—I’m wondering what other treasures have been recovered from the Great Lakes?” Although parts of Lakes Ontario, Huron and Superior are so deep that salvage has seldom been an option, Lakes Michigan and Erie have relinquished some valuable cargoes from their shallow depths. more »

Shipwrecks in Grand Cayman? You Betcha!

Melanie Boyd and Buddies Dive the Oro Verde in 1981

Melanie Boyd and Buddies Dive the Oro Verde in 1981

From big freighters to small island cargo vessels, landing craft and confiscated drug runners, Grand Cayman abounds in wrecks. The island has so many trademark reef sites including caves, walls and canyons that divers sometimes tend to overlook the wrecks. That’s one of the reasons for the sinking of the USS Kittiewake in January, 2011.

The decommissioned U.S. Navy submarine rescue vessel is a popular artificial reef sunk in 65 feet of water off the north end of Seven Mile Beach. Managed by the Cayman Islands Tourist Association, licensed dive operators and visitors pay a modest fee to snorkel or scuba dive on the Kittiwake where waters are usually calm and crystal clear. A 250-foot-long steel hull vessel with 18 bulkheads and five decks, this wreck can be visited many times without seeing the same sections twice. Strategically cut holes in the superstructure enable divers to safely navigate the captain’s cabin, crew’s quarters, wheelhouse and other spots aboard the ship. Jacks, morays, grunts and turtles are just a few of the marine inhabitants that hang around in numerous nooks and crannies. more »

Florida Shipwreck Trail: Divers’ Time Capsule

Dual Divers

Dual Divers

Do you have a bucket list? Remember the film starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman where they performed wild and crazy feats before they “kicked the bucket?” I have a friend who has a list that’s not quite as drastic. He calls it his “out of the ordinary” list. His leisure time pursuit is visiting as many college campuses as possible. So far he’s been to more than 1,000 of them.

For shipwreck enthusiasts, there’s a ready made maritime trail in Florida waters waiting for them and their list. The Florida Maritime Heritage Trail, stretching from the panhandle to the keys offers 15 historic shipwrecks, most of them in shallow waters. Many of them are snorkeling sites suitable for families. Mom, Dad and the kids can actually see and perhaps photograph the remains of an authentic treasure ship. more »

Nova Scotians Toast Bluenose II

The 140-foot Canadian schooner, Bluenose, sank in shallow water off Haiti in 1946.

The 140-foot Canadian schooner, Bluenose, sank in shallow water off Haiti in 1946.

A maritime celebration was held in September, 2013 at the UNESCO World Heritage town of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, to honor a renowned vessel–the Bluenose II.

The restored replica of the original schooner was launched amid cheers and applause. With smaller deck houses and more topside space, Bluenose II sails out of Lunenburg six months out of the year with a live-aboard crew of young Nova Scotian sailors. For the rest of the year, it joins other tall ships that visit Halifax and other ports throughout the world. more »

 

photo of Clive Cussler © Los Angeles Photographer Rob Greer

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